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Juvenile Crimes Archives

Large mob of young people blamed for mall violence incident

The holiday season may be coming to an end, but the shopping frenzies over the past month remind us that a crowd mentality can sometimes take over and cause good people do to uncharacteristically bad things.

New study shows more young people now face arrest than in the past

It seems it is becoming more common for teenagers who get in trouble with the law to be charged as adults, and we have previously written about several such cases here in Wisconsin. Behaviors that used to be viewed as the mistakes of youth are now being treated more severely by law enforcement.

Juvenile charged as adult in Wisconsin armed robbery

Wisconsin law generally states that youth 16 years old and younger will automatically be charged as a juvenile if police suspect them of a crime. Unfortunately for a Sheboygan, Wisconsin, boy, prosecutors are using a section of the law that allows juveniles to be tried as adults after police arrested him for allegedly robbing a 17 year old.

Pre-teen girl convicted of felony and misdemeanor computer crimes

In the past we have written that Wisconsin authorities take a particularly hard-line stance in two key areas: sex crimes and juvenile crimes. The age limit for juvenile delinquency in Wisconsin was lowered to just 10 years old, which is among the lowest in the nation.

Supreme Court ruling protects rights of accused minors: Part II

Earlier this week, we began a discussion about a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling which will protect the rights of minors accused of a juvenile crime. The Court recently ruled that minors who are questioned as a suspect in a crime must be considered "in custody" and have their Miranda Rights read to them by law enforcement officials.

Supreme Court ruling protects rights of accused minors: Part I

Anyone who has watched a police drama has heard: "you have the right to remain silent." This speech is known as the "Miranda Rights." Since 1966, police have been required to read a suspect their Miranda Rights at the time of arrest. The goal is to inform a suspect that he doesn't have to incriminate himself by answering police questions.

Wisconsin Supreme Court keeps life sentence for juvenile: Part III

Last week, we began a series of posts about the difficulties and controversies of sentencing juvenile offenders for serious crimes such as murder. Most juvenile crimes are generally sentenced lightly, with the understanding that minors make mistakes and should be allowed to reform as they grow older.

Wisconsin Supreme Court keeps life sentence for juvenile: Part II

Earlier this week, we began a discussion about the Wisconsin Supreme Court's decision to uphold a sentence of life without parole for a man who committed first-degree murder when he was just 14 years old. The recent ruling highlights Wisconsin's difficult and often controversial viewpoints about how to punish juvenile crime.

Wisconsin Supreme Court keeps life sentence for juvenile: Part I

In January, we wrote that the Wisconsin Supreme Court was reviewing an unusual and difficult case of juvenile crime. The Court needed to decide whether or not to uphold a sentence of life without parole for a man who killed another teenager when he was only 14 years old.

Wisconsin Boy Who Set Deadly Fire May Be Too Young To Prosecute

When it comes to handling crimes committed by children and juveniles there are often no clear guidelines. Prosecutors must ask themselves many questions about the child's age as well as his maturity level. They are also left to wonder if the child can even understand that what he has done is wrong.

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